Understanding Big Data in Healthcare

Big Data in Healthcare Gerald Jerry George Mannikarote dMann Training Technologies

by Gerald George Mannikarote, MBBS MBA

I’ve been consulted on several occasions to assist with various healthcare companies’ entry into Big Data management.  The most common question is how to translate the data they own into something meaningful. However, often the challenge for most businesses is making something meaningful from that data.

Translating Big Data into something meaningful is more than just hiring a consultant.  It also takes understanding what data you have.  The data collected has to be related to something that helps define the company and their customers’ needs.

Meaningful Data

What most of the companies I’ve worked with are happy to inform is that their patient outcomes are very good.  So what does that mean?  What do they mean by good outcomes?  How does that help their customers?

If you keep in mind that the end user is a patient, but your customer provides care for the patient, this better defines how to use Big Data.  So you must better define your customer.  Is your customer a physician, a healthcare provider system, or a healthcare payer?  By defining who your customer is, you will be able to define how you use your Big Data.

Big Data in Healthcare Gerald Jerry George Mannikarote dMann Training Technologies
How do you make your Big Data meaningful?

Let’s take a healthcare provider system for example.  Assume the provider system is interested in reducing readmissions.  In such a case, you will need to find a way to show how your Big Data correlates with reducing readmissions.

In the case of physicians, it may be something different.  Let’s say the physician is interested in reducing patient expenses.  In such a situation, your Big Data needs reflect how it reduces costs for the patient.

What about payers?  How do you tailor Big Data for such an audience?  Maybe the payer is interested in improved clinical outcomes with lower healthcare costs.  Then you must be able to demonstrate that your Big Data can not only improve healthcare outcomes but also lower healthcare costs.

Providing Value

By successfully demonstrating how Big Data is meaningful to your customer, you will be able to provide your customer with a meaningful solution.  A meaningful solution provides value to your customer.  Providing value demonstrates understanding.  This will then demonstrate your understanding of Big Data in Healthcare.

Big Data in Healthcare Gerald Jerry George Mannikarote dMann Training Technologies
Big Data in Healthcare. It’s world wide

I encourage you to analyze the your Big Data.  Are you making your Big Data meaningful to your customers?  Does your Big Data bring value to your customers? How have you been able to demonstrate meaningful Big Data to your customer?  Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  I would love to hear from you.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

Self Perception Trumps Good Performance

Self Perception Trumps Good Performance

My Greatest Lesson in Sales

My Greatest Lesson in Sales

by Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA

Partnership
Photo courtesy Pixabay

When I started my sales career, there was a lot of learning I had to go through.  Some of it was through formal training.  A lot of it was on the job, trial by fire, and getting kicked in the head a lot.

I remember being told very often that I was very intelligent and that I would excel in my job.  This was great to hear but it wasn’t helpful. The praise did not give me the feedback I needed to truly excel in my job.

My first sales calls were generally with a team mate that had much more experience than me.  This was a great way to learn but I rarely received any critical feedback. As I progressed in my job, I began to do sales calls on my own.

There was one particular sales call that I made with customer.  The two of us went together to call on a mutual customer of ours.  It was during this call I learned a lot.

The customer that joined me on this sales call had many years of sales experience.  His opinion was one that I respected.  I was determined to ask him to critique me when the sales call was over.

At the mutual customer’s office, I gave a great presentation.  The team from the mutual customer’s side asked me a lot of questions.  They saw me as an authority in the subject I presented.  They were highly engaged with my presentation.

When I was done, I took leave and my customer friend left with me.  We had come to this office in my car, so it was only natural for us to begin talking once we got back in the car.

I asked him what he thought of my presentation.  I asked him to be straight up with me.  His answer still rings strong with me even today…

He said the presentation was amazing- one of the best presentations he had ever attended.  He also said the group was highly engaged and were pretty much eating out of my hands.  Then he asked me the question that taught me a lot.

He asked me what I got out of the presentation.  I asked him what he meant by that.  He repeated the question- ‘What did YOU get out of the presentation?’.  The question still baffled me.  I didn’t understand.  I thought my job was to give a presentation.

He then gave me my greatest lesson in sales.  He said, ‘You are a salesman.  Not an answer giver.  A salesman gets a sale.  If not a sale, you must get something before you leave.’  He explained to me that I did not get anything out of the sales call- except for the fact that the team enjoyed my presentation.  He also explained that I should’ve have at least got a date to see them again- get something.  He even said that getting a ‘No’ is better than getting nothing.

So, ever since that sales call, I’ve made it a point to get something from any sales call that I’ve made- even if it’s a no.  This tremendous lesson has stayed with me since then.  I’ve shared this lesson with my mentees and team members that I’ve trained.  I hope you find this lesson a valuable one… and see why it was my greatest lesson in sales.

What is your greatest lesson in sales?  Leave your thoughts in the comments.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com