Big Data in Healthcare Delivery: The Power of HEDIS

Big Data in Healthcare Delivery: The Power of HEDIS

First in a Series

By Patrick K. Wier

This summer’s never ending debate on healthcare in the halls of Capitol Hill and the virtual halls on the internet is so complex it’s hard to wrap your head around. Why are costs so high? Why do there appear so many inefficiencies? The queries go on and on. One place to begin a greater understanding is the revolution that is taking hold in industry overall, however, at a slower pace in healthcare- big data.

Big Data: HEDIS
Big Data: HEDIS: Patrick Knight Weir dMann Training Technologies

Patients, providers, payors and vendors alike have a shared experience within the system through management of patient data in the form of huge stores of physical folders or electronic health records (EHR). Slowly and at large sums of investment practitioners are transitioning to one of the many forms of an EHR. This is an effort to capture the powerful effect of big data. Effectively utilized big data along with other interconnected electric devices the industry seeks to improve health outcomes while lowering costs associated with managing health conditions.

Leveraging technology to connect patients to providers to payors by linking multitudes of patient data while abiding by HIPPA regulations can bring about significant improvements in leading health complications like congestive heart failure, COPD and diabetes. Understanding patient information in a real time manner while learning constraints on the system can lead to more effective utilization of resources and reduce wasteful spending such as needless testing.

Payors and patients can learn which providers deliver greater results through established metric ratings developed by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). An example of this is seen in the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) which collects performance measures across 80 different dimensions of care and service. Insurers are constantly collecting data and rating all providers across the country to assess the effectiveness of health care delivery. Through the use of this scoring system health systems are constantly squeezing increased value in business results aligned with improved health outcomes for numerous health complications.

In conclusion, as more and more providers switch to EHRs payors can adjust payout rates to practitioners and deliver improved health outcomes which ultimately trickles down to the patient. Big data is the driver of progress in the industry and needs to be considered in our national conversation and on Capitol Hill when assessing how we carry out one of the most costly concerns in all individuals and families.

What other means can big data serve and address current inefficiencies in the U.S. healthcare system?  Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  We would love to hear from you.  You can also contact us at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

Be A STAR Communicator

Be a STAR Communicator

by Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA

Several years ago, I was introduced to something that was intended to help a person with job interviews.  It is called the STAR technique.  I later learned that it can applied as a communication tool in many ways.

In case you aren’t familiar with it, STAR is an acronym for Situation, Task, Action, and Result. I was told that this is a good way to explain how you approached a project discussion during an interview. But I quickly learned that this same technique is a great way to communicate your ideas to others.

STAR communicator
Be a STAR communicator

Let’s break it down…

Situation

When you have an idea, sale, or a project that you want to relay to another person, it’s not enough to impose your thoughts on them and expect something.  By using the STAR technique, you lay the foundation by explaining the situation at hand.  Whether it’s your idea, a sale’s pitch, or a project you are leading, by explaining the situation that needs to be addressed, you much likelier to be understood.

Task

Once you have laid the foundation by communicating the situation, you can now discuss what needs to be done, i.e. the tasks at hand.  This will help communicate what roles and jobs may need to be developed.  By discussing the tasks, it will be easier to communicate what actions and results are expected.  For example, if it is a sale, this helps explain who would benefit from the product or service.  If it is a project you are leading, this will help communicate the various roles that need to be filled.

Action

This communication piece will help you describe the duties needed to be completed in order to be successful.  In a sales situation, this could be the fact that the customer needs to sign on the dotted line.  In a project situation, this would be the actions each member would be taking on in their prescribed roles. If you are pitching an idea to a group, this will tell them what actions need to be completed in respect to the tasks at hand.

Result

This is the bit of communication that people look forward to.  If you are selling something, they want to know what’ in it for them if they made a purchase.  If you are leading a project, then what is the end goal?  If you are pitching an idea, then it simply makes sense to explain the end goal of the project.

I hope you found this twist on STAR intriguing, and even helpful. Have you used the STAR technique before?  What are some ways you have used it?  Please leave your thoughts in the comments.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com . If you’ve liked what you’ve read, please share it with others.  Now go other there and be a STAR!

 

 

Self Perception Trumps Good Performance

Self Perception Trumps Good Performance

Taking the HEAT in Customer Service

Taking the HEAT in Customer Service

Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA

HEAT
Taking the HEAT in Customer Service

It’s my personal belief that no matter who you are in any company, you are a representative in that company.  Being a representative also means providing customer service.  That also means handling customer complaints.

Years ago, I used to train customer service representatives in some soft skills.  There I learned of a technique taught by one of the other trainers.  This was the HEAT technique for handling customer complaints.  This technique has remained with me all these years.

HEAT is an acronym that helps us understand the customer’s needs and handle the complaint.  It lists, in order, what to do.  Let’s dive into HEAT.

 

H- Hear Out the Customer

This simply means that you give an ear to the customer’s issue.  Sometimes just doing this will diffuse the situation.  Hearing the customer out, makes a tremendous difference.

E- Empathize

By doing this, you are letting the customer know that you care.  You are trying to make an attempt to understand the situation.  This often goes a long way with customers

A- Accept Responsibility

Accepting responsibility means not passing the buck.  It means not saying that it’s not your job and pushing the complaint aside.  It means you are willing to apologize on behalf of the company you work for and you will do whatever is in your power to improve the situation.

T- Take Action

Take action.  I don’t really have to elaborate on this.  Do something to change the situation within your power.  Connect the customer with the right person.  Send out an email.  Let the customer know that you have done everything you could have done to make the situation better.  I personally think this helps lead to a sense of calm.

Use HEAT to bring a sense of calm in the situation
Use HEAT to bring a sense of calm in the situation

Learning these steps helped me better understand what the customer needed and wanted in many situations.  These steps helped me also realize there are simply the things I would like also as a customer if I had a complaint.  These steps helped me also become a better customer.

 

Have you ever been in a situation where you had to deal with a customer complaint?  What steps did you take to diffuse the situation? Have you ever used the HEAT technique?  Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  I would love to hear from you.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

 

 

Trump Your Next Presentation

Trump Your Next Presentation

5 Tips  to Present Like Mr. Trump

by Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA

Trump Your Presentation
Trump Your Presentation

Like him or not, Donald Trump is someone to watch.  Entertaining could be one word to describe him.  In fact, these days, when Trump talks, people listen- no matter what he says.

There are certain things that Trump does that ensures people listen to him.  We can learn a thing or two from the talks and speeches he provides.  Here are a few things that you can learn from Trump to add to your next talk or presentation.  It just might make you more entertaining and cause people to listen to you.

1. Have a signature look
Trump Your Look
Trump Your Look

People make fun of Trump’s hair, but he owns it.  And no matter where he goes, he is recognizable.  But don’t forget his solid colored ties and power suits.  He has a signature look.

A signature look can help you feel more confident when you are speaking in front of people. It gives you one less thing to worry about.  It can also help you feel good about yourself.  I had a friend that used to wear Superman cufflinks and Superman socks when he had important presentations to give.

2. Be Dramatic
The Art of the Expression
The Art of the Expression

Trump uses a lot of hand motions, gestures, and facial expressions when he talks.  In other words, he uses a lot of drama.  He’s not dull.  He’s in fact an actor of sorts.

By using motion, facial expressions, and gestures, you give your audience another dimension to your presentation.  Adding another dimension to your presentation keeps it from getting dull.  Otherwise you will simply be the flesh and bones version of a boring slide deck.

3. Make a lot of noise
Trump Your Voice
Trump Your Voice

When Trump speaks, he makes a lot of noise.  It causes people to wake up.  People wait to hear what he will say next.  It keeps them on the edge of their seat.

When presenting to an audience, use inflections in your voice.  Changes in your tone keeps the presentation interesting.  This reduces the chance of your presentation being a chance to look at one’s smart phone.

4. Be entertaining
Trump a Rock Star
Trump a Rock Star

Trump is entertaining because he gives the audience what they want to hear.  If you like him, you want to hear what he says to cheer him on.  If you don’t like him, you want to hear what he says so that you can complain about whatever he’s talking about.  Either way, Trump gives people what they want to hear.

When presenting, give your audience what they want to hear.  Don’t get bogged down in the details that you think is important.  Talk about what the audience finds important.  They will find this entertaining as opposed to being forced to attend a meeting as usual.

5. Be bold
Trump Boldness
Trump Boldness

Trump is bold.  He knows what he says may make others uncomfortable, but he says it anyway.  And he is willing to stand behind what he says.

When presenting in front of others, don’t worry about what others are going to say.  Be bold.  As I said earlier, don’t worry about the details.  If you are questioned on what you present, stand behind it.  You can provide details if asked, or even after a presentation.

These 5 tips will help you Trump your next presentation.  Once you use these tips, let me and others know how it goes.  Do you have any tips to Trump a presentation?  If so, let others know. Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  I would love to hear from you.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

The Sweetest Sound in Business

The Sweetest Sound in Business

By Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA
The Sweetest Sound in Business
The Sweetest Sound in Business

What is the sweetest sound in business?  Many people feel that it is the clink of cold hard cash in a money box.  I would beg to disagree.

When I began my training as a physician, I was taught that the sweetest sound to any human being’s ears is the sound of their name.  I learned the importance of treating a patient as an individual and not as a ‘case’.  I learned to ask for the patient’s name, not just for the sake of identification, but more for the reason of providing a personal touch to someone that is seeking my help.  I sadly did not think of transferring this valuable lesson to other aspects of my life until many years later.

One of my mentors reminded me of this when I did a ride along early on in my sales career.  I remember walking into a hospital with him and going a nurse’s station and approaching the nurse that was there.  My mentor immediately asked the nurse a question.  However, with great finesse, he prefixed the question with the nurse’s name.

The nurse smiled and gave my mentor the answer we needed and we went on our way.  I asked him how he knew the nurse.  He told me he had never met her before.  I then asked him how he knew her name.  His answer made me remember my training as a physician.

He said, “She had a name tag on.”  “Why wouldn’t you use her name if you can see her name tag?”  I immediately remembered ‘The Sweetest Sound’.

The Sweetest Sound
The Sweetest Sound

We often use, Ms, Mr, Sir, Ma’am as signs of respect.  But often, this appears impersonal.  The use of a person’s name brings your conversation to another level.

Another mentor of mine showed me this in action in another scenario.  This time we were the customers.  We sat down for a lunch meeting and he asked the server to repeat his name.  The server looked surprised.  My mentor then explained to him, “I’d rather call you by your name than call you ‘Hey’ or ‘Excuse me’.”  This helped me better understand the impact of ‘The Sweetest Sound’.

Now I make a strong attempt in using people’s names when interacting with them.  I often get told that I am great with names.  But that is truly not the case.  The truth is I make a strong attempt in learning and using a person’s name.  I make a strong attempt at creating ‘The Sweetest Sound’ in business.

What is ‘The Sweetest Sound’ to you?  Have you used ‘The Sweetest Sound’, i.e. a person’s name, in a situation outside your immediate circle to create a more personal situation for your business?  Has it ever backfired on you? Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  I would love to hear from you.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com