Big Data in Healthcare Delivery: The Power of HEDIS

Big Data in Healthcare Delivery: The Power of HEDIS

First in a Series

By Patrick K. Wier

This summer’s never ending debate on healthcare in the halls of Capitol Hill and the virtual halls on the internet is so complex it’s hard to wrap your head around. Why are costs so high? Why do there appear so many inefficiencies? The queries go on and on. One place to begin a greater understanding is the revolution that is taking hold in industry overall, however, at a slower pace in healthcare- big data.

Big Data: HEDIS
Big Data: HEDIS: Patrick Knight Weir dMann Training Technologies

Patients, providers, payors and vendors alike have a shared experience within the system through management of patient data in the form of huge stores of physical folders or electronic health records (EHR). Slowly and at large sums of investment practitioners are transitioning to one of the many forms of an EHR. This is an effort to capture the powerful effect of big data. Effectively utilized big data along with other interconnected electric devices the industry seeks to improve health outcomes while lowering costs associated with managing health conditions.

Leveraging technology to connect patients to providers to payors by linking multitudes of patient data while abiding by HIPPA regulations can bring about significant improvements in leading health complications like congestive heart failure, COPD and diabetes. Understanding patient information in a real time manner while learning constraints on the system can lead to more effective utilization of resources and reduce wasteful spending such as needless testing.

Payors and patients can learn which providers deliver greater results through established metric ratings developed by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). An example of this is seen in the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) which collects performance measures across 80 different dimensions of care and service. Insurers are constantly collecting data and rating all providers across the country to assess the effectiveness of health care delivery. Through the use of this scoring system health systems are constantly squeezing increased value in business results aligned with improved health outcomes for numerous health complications.

In conclusion, as more and more providers switch to EHRs payors can adjust payout rates to practitioners and deliver improved health outcomes which ultimately trickles down to the patient. Big data is the driver of progress in the industry and needs to be considered in our national conversation and on Capitol Hill when assessing how we carry out one of the most costly concerns in all individuals and families.

What other means can big data serve and address current inefficiencies in the U.S. healthcare system?  Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  We would love to hear from you.  You can also contact us at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

GIVE ME 20!

Give Me 20!

By Tony Jewell

Have you ever thought about what would happen if you gave another 20% effort towards achieving your goal?  Let me explain.  Most people would say at the beginning of the New Year they have a goal they want to achieve.  But, what is your plan?  Are you even going to give it 100% effort?  Do you really think by just telling others you want something, that it will magically happen?  Well, most people do.

dmann training technologies
Can you give 20%

So, last year I tried something. What would happen when I changed my Fitbit daily goal for steps from 10,000 to 12,000, a 20% increase?  Well, I can tell you without making any other changes I lost an additional 8 pounds.  I then began to think, what if I began to apply the 20% rule to other parts of my life?

  • What if I practiced putting 20% more, what would that do for my golf game?
  • What if I focused 20% more on my Top 20 customers (usually 80% of your business comes from your top 20% of customers)?
  • What if I spent 20% more effort on my personal relationships?
  • And this one might hurt but, what if I spent 20% less time on social media???

Please note, this does not mean just spending 20% time, this means 20% focused on this one goal!

dMann Training Technologies
20% More!

Some interesting facts…

  • People who exercised during their workday were 23 percent more productive on those days than they were when they didn’t exercise, says a recent study from the International Journal of Workplace Health Management.
  • A study in Neurobiology of Learning and Memory found that people learned vocabulary words 20 percent faster after intense exercise than after low-intensity activity.
  • At Google, the company allows 20 percent of an employee’s time to be spent to develop projects of their own interest.
dMann Training Technologies
20% more for 2017

For the upcoming year, I want you to think about something…don’t think about doing more with less, think about doing more with what you have…GIVE ME YOUR 20!

Stay Healthy While Traveling for Work

I used to travel quite a bit for work.  During those trips, I always found it a challenge to stay healthy.  But I get by with a little help with my friends.  It was through friends that I realized and learned what I needed to do to stay healthy while traveling for work.

What I’ve learned, from myself as well as others, was interesting.  People tend to take a vacation from being healthy when traveling for work.  If they normally exercise and eat right at home, they tend to throw all of that out of the window when traveling for work.

dMann Training
Stay Healthy While Traveling for Work

Often times, people say it’s very challenging to stay healthy when traveling for work.  “I have to eat out a lot.”  “The hotel doesn’t have a gym.”  “The meeting was really late.”  “The customer wanted to meet over a couple of beers.”  Yes, the challenges are real.

The challenges are real, but like I said, I got by with a little help from my friends.  I have been lucky to have a few friends that understand health and wellness very well. They helped me understand the challenges that I faced because they faced them as well.

One of the biggest lessons that I learned was that you can have what you want if you make it a priority.  So, if you want health, you will make that a priority.  You can have what you want if you really want it.

For example, if the hotel doesn’t have a gym, you can work out in your room or even just take a walk outside.  If you have to eat out, you learn what are the right things to order from the menu.  If the meeting was to be over a few beers, you learn what beers or drinks to order.  If the meeting is expected to run really late, you learn how to close the meeting on time.

dMann Training
You Can Work Out in Your Hotel Room

The late meeting example still resonates with me.  I had a friend in a previous company that I worked for that did the same job as I did.  She read to her children every night.  Even when she traveled for work.  She scheduled her meetings to close at the right time so that she could call her children, even in the parking lot, and read to them.  You can have what you want if you really want it.

At dMann Training, we plan to have a series of posts to help you stay healthy while traveling for work or even at home.  I hope this post gave you a chance to think about it.  And maybe even some tips.

So what do you do to stay healthy while you travel for work?  What do you do to stay healthy at home?  Leave your thoughts in the comments.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

 

Self Perception Trumps Good Performance

Self Perception Trumps Good Performance

Are You Achieving Perfection in Your Job?

Are You Achieving Perfection in Your Job?

By Gerald Jerry George MBBS MBA

 

Why be perfect in your job?  It will get you ahead, right?  Wrong!

Are you perfect at your job?
Are you perfect at your job?

It took me a while to understand this.  And when I say a while, I mean years.  I’ll explain why…

When I began my career in corporate America, I wanted to excel and prove myself.  I took on many projects- probably more than I should have.  I did this to look good in eyes of my bosses and peers.

The problem with this however, was at that time I equated being busy with being successful.  I was always working on something and took my work home.  I felt that being so busy was a sign of being successful- that I was somebody.

As I began to look more closely into my skill sets I began to question my busyness. Was I really that successful?  Was I really getting things done?

With self analysis and self appraisals, I began to better understand myself.  I also had great mentors that helped me understand my strengths and weaknesses.  It was through this I began to better understand why I was so busy.

I learned that I was busy not because of the number of projects I took on, but what I was doing in those projects.  I was looking for perfection.  Trying to attain perfection caused me to lose sight of the big picture and get bogged down in the details.

On further analysis of the pursuit of perfection, I realized that this was actually a form of procrastination.  I was using to perfectionism to mask any insecurities that I may have had regarding the projects I was working on… One more tweak and this will look better…  One more revision… One more adjustment… One more whatever…

By learning this about myself, I began to manage my time more efficiently.  I was able to get projects completed on time without having to add so much extra time before and after work hours.  I learned how to do things right without overwhelming myself.  And possibly the most important lesson here was that there was a difference between excellence and perfection.

Excellence of Perfection
Choice: Wisdom or Perfectionism?

I had a friend that worked for another large multi-national company.  He showed me something that was often told to them at that company- ‘Done is better than perfect.’  I loved that.  I found it very profound.

Since then I’ve learned the difference between perfection and procrastination.  Good enough is not good enough, but trying to attain perfection is a never ending battle.  So I learned to do things right within the allotted time period- without trying to be perfect. I learned to pursue excellence and not perfection.  I also learned not to equate being busy with being successful. This helped me improve my productivity and reduce my procrastination.

So, I encourage you analyze your work habits.  Are you unnecessarily busy?  Are you using something like perfection to procrastinate? Have you ever discovered any habits you may have that are actually forms of procrastination?  Please leave your thoughts in the comments section.  I would love to hear from you.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

 

 

My Greatest Lesson in Sales

My Greatest Lesson in Sales

by Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA

Partnership
Photo courtesy Pixabay

When I started my sales career, there was a lot of learning I had to go through.  Some of it was through formal training.  A lot of it was on the job, trial by fire, and getting kicked in the head a lot.

I remember being told very often that I was very intelligent and that I would excel in my job.  This was great to hear but it wasn’t helpful. The praise did not give me the feedback I needed to truly excel in my job.

My first sales calls were generally with a team mate that had much more experience than me.  This was a great way to learn but I rarely received any critical feedback. As I progressed in my job, I began to do sales calls on my own.

There was one particular sales call that I made with customer.  The two of us went together to call on a mutual customer of ours.  It was during this call I learned a lot.

The customer that joined me on this sales call had many years of sales experience.  His opinion was one that I respected.  I was determined to ask him to critique me when the sales call was over.

At the mutual customer’s office, I gave a great presentation.  The team from the mutual customer’s side asked me a lot of questions.  They saw me as an authority in the subject I presented.  They were highly engaged with my presentation.

When I was done, I took leave and my customer friend left with me.  We had come to this office in my car, so it was only natural for us to begin talking once we got back in the car.

I asked him what he thought of my presentation.  I asked him to be straight up with me.  His answer still rings strong with me even today…

He said the presentation was amazing- one of the best presentations he had ever attended.  He also said the group was highly engaged and were pretty much eating out of my hands.  Then he asked me the question that taught me a lot.

He asked me what I got out of the presentation.  I asked him what he meant by that.  He repeated the question- ‘What did YOU get out of the presentation?’.  The question still baffled me.  I didn’t understand.  I thought my job was to give a presentation.

He then gave me my greatest lesson in sales.  He said, ‘You are a salesman.  Not an answer giver.  A salesman gets a sale.  If not a sale, you must get something before you leave.’  He explained to me that I did not get anything out of the sales call- except for the fact that the team enjoyed my presentation.  He also explained that I should’ve have at least got a date to see them again- get something.  He even said that getting a ‘No’ is better than getting nothing.

So, ever since that sales call, I’ve made it a point to get something from any sales call that I’ve made- even if it’s a no.  This tremendous lesson has stayed with me since then.  I’ve shared this lesson with my mentees and team members that I’ve trained.  I hope you find this lesson a valuable one… and see why it was my greatest lesson in sales.

What is your greatest lesson in sales?  Leave your thoughts in the comments.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com

5 Reasons to Manage Your Time More Effectively

5 Reasons to Manage Your Time More Effectively

By Gerald Jerry George, MBBS MBA

5 Reasons to Manage Your Time Effectively
5 Reasons to Manage Your Time Effectively
Pic Courtesy: Viktor Janacek via PicJumbo

I remember when I first started my career.  It used to be very prestigious to be able to multi-task and fly by the seat of your pants.  Being very busy seemed to show that you were very successful.  It took me a long time to learn that busy-ness does not equate to productivity or success.  I also learned that by managing my time, I always had time to complete what was on my priority list.

Time management has become such a crucial skill that there are hundreds of books written about the subject.  There are myriads of courses on it.  But people still seem to have trouble with this particular skill.

With all this being said, why manage your time?  Here are 5 reasons:

  1. You can be more productive at work

By understanding what’s important at work, you can manage your time to tackle the important projects at work.  Those projects that are both important to you and your boss.  If your boss feels that TPS cover sheets are important, you can chalk out time to complete those.  And you can push fixing the copy machine to some other time that’s not occupied by what will get you ahead.

  1. You can work on your passion projects

You may have some projects at work that you are passionate about, but may not be considered important by the powers that be.  By managing your time, you can get your important tasks out of the way and schedule some time about the paper clip inventory that you are so passionate about.  This way the bosses can get their TPS cover sheets and you can complete your paper clip inventory.

  1. You can pursue a hobby

So, we are often driven to succeed that we are often the first in the office and last to leave.  In my opinion, this is poor management of time.  If you manage your time wisely, you can leave the office on time and get to your paper clip collection at home.

  1. You can have more time for your friends and family

As in the last point, time management does not end at the office.  By managing your time, you can enjoy more time with your friends and family.  You will be able to schedule time to people that matter most to you.

  1. You can take care of yourself

Often times, very busy people say they don’t have time to exercise.  I remember when President George Bush Jr was in office, I learned that he scheduled time to exercise every day.  In the same article, it said that if the President of the United States can find time to exercise, so can you.  By managing your time, you can take care of the most important asset you have- yourself.  Schedule time to exercise (mental and physical) and to eat right.   This will help you move forward in all aspects of your life.

So these 5 points show you some good reasons to invest in time management.  What are some other reasons you should manage your time?  Leave your thoughts in the comments.  You can also contact me at jerrydmann@dmanntraining.com